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Light
It is divine energy. It has the power to set the mood of a scene with color, brightness and contrast. It is the paint on a cinematographers canvas.

Two scenes from the opening of a show called "The Witness." Side lighting with deep shadows and close-ups were used to establish a realistic and moody atmosphere. Smoke was also added to enhance the look.

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Sword.JPGIn this situation I took advantage of the natural light. The women on the bridge looks on at the raging battle ... and also blocks the stop sign behind her! This footage was shot for a music video.

 

piano.jpgAgain, using natural light. In this situation it was for an interior location. The warehouse's frosted glass windows combined with filtration provided the required look and feel for the scene of this music video. The warm sepia effect was accomplished in the film to tape transfer.


hosp.JPGFeigning natural light. This commercial was shot at a hospital which had recently added a wing of birthing rooms. The overhead fluorescent lights were of course flat and unflattering and the out side was overcast. We wanted a nice, warm sunny feeling, so I used an 18,000 watt HMI out side of the room's window to simulate sunlight with tree branches placed in front to break up the light. The lighting combined with filtration on the camera lens gave us the desired result.

 

From a project I did for Rolling Rock beer. I gave it a "Film Noir" look reminiscent of the lighting style used in the films of the 1940's. Notice how the absence of color is as effective as adding color to set a mood.

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The fine art of photographing reflective surfaces.
Large white surfaces are used to reflect into the product. The trick is to know what will be reflected back into the lens and taking the steps to control those variables.

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Harley - Davidson

Gumout gasoline treatment

 

Caddy.JPGThis nineteen foot long 1960 Cadillac was used for a Hudson's Department store commercial in the Detroit Michigan market. Special dollies placed under each tire allowed one person to position the car. Close ups of the cars reflective surface were combined with reflections of fireworks in post production.

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